We can make it better
Home    Info    Ask
JayKay: 24. Baby lawyer. Sydneysider.

"Spin Madly On" theme by Margarette Bacani. Powered by Tumblr.

iyfit:

I love my skin!

Beautiful thing to teach kids

(Source: arthaemisia, via iamgigiteo)


Scarlett in The Black Dahlia 

Scarlett in The Black Dahlia 

(Source: scarlettjohnsson, via angelrpg)

damaged-original:

Saw this on my travels at the weekend…seems appropriate

damaged-original:

Saw this on my travels at the weekend…seems appropriate

(via battaille)

(Source: university-style, via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: -teesa-, via australiansanta)

In ‘Apocalypto,’ the arrival of the Spanish signals ‘a new beginning.’ Remarkably, the event is portrayed as tranquil, as if the Spaniards are the adults who have finally come to rescue the ‘littleuns’ stranded on the island of William Golding’s ‘Lord of the Flies.’ In reality, the arrival was anything but serene.

Within decades of the first contact with the Spaniards, the Maya would die in the hundreds of thousands as European diseases, colonial exploitation and cruelty took root. In 1552, in the name of Christian piety, Fray Diego de Landa ordered that hundreds of Maya codices, carrying sacred knowledge accumulated over centuries, be burned as works of the devil.

If there were ever an apocalypse in the history of the Maya — and herein lies the ultimate demoralizing irony of the movie — it would be because of European contact. But in the movie, after two hours of excess, hyperbole and hysteria, the Spaniards represent the arrival of sanity to the Maya world. The tacit paternalism is devastating.

After many centuries of misguided and simplistic views of the Maya, recent scholarship has shown the complexity and historical depth of their civilization. In Maya society, as in all civilizations, violence, surfeit and disparity were balanced by accomplishment, restraint and illumination. Gibson’s feverish vision of a childish Maya society sacrificing itself to extinction is more than inaccurate, it works against the progress of decades of diligent scholarship to restore to present-day Maya people a heritage of which they are proud, and from which we have much to learn. I can only hope that audiences seeing this movie will be motivated to learn about the Maya — present and past — rather than be sated by Gibson’s sacrificial offering at the altar of entertainment.

—From Maya in the Thunderdome, a review of Mel Gibson’s filmic farce, Apocalypto (via nezua)
hiphopclassicks:

18 years ago today, one of the greatest rappers that ever lived was stripped from the hip hop community.  There isn’t much I can say that I haven’t already said before.  More than a rapper, more than a actor, more than a poet. Tupac is a legend; & his legacy lives on.
& we still mourn…

hiphopclassicks:

18 years ago today, one of the greatest rappers that ever lived was stripped from the hip hop community.  There isn’t much I can say that I haven’t already said before.  More than a rapper, more than a actor, more than a poet. Tupac is a legend; & his legacy lives on.

& we still mourn…

(via bvsedjesus)

(via sensubeans)

(Source: lunar-skies, via australiansanta)

“In general, I think we need to move away from the premise that being a good person is a fixed immutable characteristic and shift towards seeing being good as a practice. And it is a practice that we carry out by engaging with our imperfections. We need to shift towards thinking that being a good person is like being a clean person. Being a clean person is something you maintain and work on every day.We don’t assume ‘I am a clean person therefore I don’t need to brush my teeth.’ When someone suggests to us that we have something stuck in our teeth we don’t say to them ‘What do you mean I have something stuck in my teeth—but I’m a clean person?!’” —Jay Smooth in his TED speech “how I learned to stop worrying and love discussing race” (via tropicanastasia)

(via -pariah)

“I loved her not for the way she danced with my angels, but for the way the sound of her name could silence my demons.” —Christopher Poindexter (via perfect)

(Source: larmoyante, via kimmyvondoom)

“Forget the mistakes of the past and press on to the greater achievements of the future. Give everyone a smile. Spend so much time improving yourself that you have no time left to criticize others. Be too big for worry and too noble for anger.” —Norman Vincent Peale (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

(via blogfancypants)

My Least Favorite Trope (and this post will include spoilers for The Lego Movie, Guardians of the Galaxy, The Matrix, Western Civilization, and—cod help me—Bulletproof Monk*.) is the thing where there’s an awesome, smart, wonderful, powerful female character who by all rights ought to be the Chosen One and the hero of the movie, who is tasked with taking care of some generally ineffectual male character who is, for reasons of wish fulfillment, actually the person the film focuses on. She mentors him, she teaches him, and she inevitably becomes his girlfriend… and he gets the job she wanted: he gets to be the Chosen One even though she’s obviously far more qualified. And all he has to do to get it and deserve it is Man Up and Take Responsibility.

And that’s it. Every god-damned time. The mere fact of naming the films above and naming the trope gives away the entire plot and character arc of every single movie.

—Elizabeth Bear - My Least Favorite Trope (via feministquotes)

(via battaille)

Jimmy Pineapple, opening for Bill Hicks

(Source: real-hiphophead, via hiphoplaboratory)

theurbanmoor:

ka—tie:

Michael Jackson & Marvin Gaye

theurbanmoor:

ka—tie:

Michael Jackson & Marvin Gaye

(Source: mjhideout.com, via questcalledtribe)